ostentiferous

I'm very pleased to present my music video for Bosnian techno producer Oleka. I contacted the label Power Vacuum to ask if they had a project for me to work on, because I had an idea knocking around my head that I wanted to make, and figured that a deadline would ensure I stopped playing Wolfenstein long enough to work on it. Milo sent me a track he wanted a vid done for. When I played the track, however, I was blown away. The music was both better and more hardcore than the idea that I had envisioned, which was pieces of flatpack furniture animated to look like they were fucking, Gondry-style. I'm glad Milo never asked me what my first idea was.

By a process of elimination, and a bit of soul searching, and asking everyone from my best friend to my hairdresser, I settled upon a far narrower band of influences than googling 'techno music video' would provide. Architectural line art from the Sixties, Ray Metzker's urban black-and-white photography from Fifties New York and Flavio Samelo's images of Seventies Sao Paulo architecture, film noir, Akira, countless reams of photos of heavy industrial machinery, foundries, forges - all of these finally began to coalesce into the mood I was looking to convey: heavy metal noir.

That does not mean moody Berghain cunts in gothic-lettered hoodies sporting septum piercings. Techno, not having lyrics, exists as an antithesis to capitalism, having first been born in the industrial desert of Detroit. No capitalism = no techno. Techno's nihilism describes the necessary entropy of capitalism's excess - so fuck it - yes warehouses, yes machinery, yes moody-as-fuck black and white. It's fun to make. Yes skulls.

After two weeks gathering source images and editing an animatic, work began in earnest; modelling and texturing about 100 assets, 30+ scenes, 12 GB of projects, assets and textures made over 6 weeks of production time. Almost the whole video was made in Cinema 4D; I experimented with Octane's Toon shaders but they ultimately couldn't reproduce the toon look I've come to love using with the Cel shader in C4D's native renderer, despite the anti-aliasing requiring much larger rendered frames to look crisp. Where appropriate, I exported models to Unfold3D for UV mapping and as such there's a little Substance Designer and Painter in there - just to break up tiling surfaces more than anything.

I sincerely hope you enjoy the fruits of my labour.

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© Edmund Brown 2019

© Edmund Brown 2019